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Downloading, streaming annual earnings greater than radio, figures show
#1
Full article is here:

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-10-20/an...io/7948246

My first reaction was "ho hum, so what's new?" But on reading the full article, there were a couple of things that caught my eye and are worth emphasising:

Quote:Australian songwriters, composers and publishers made a record $333 million in the past year..... up 11 per cent on the previous year.

Royalty collections from streaming services increased by 140 per cent in 2015-16, to $27.4 million.

So much for downloading killing off the music industry.

Quote:But radio is doing more than just holding its own, it's increasing as well
Just not increasing as fast as streaming, but still increasing. Reports of the death of radio are greatly exaggerated.

And further down, a reality check:
Quote:... while the percentage increase in digital revenue was dramatic, it was still coming off a fairly low base."The actual revenues are still yet to flow through in an incredibly meaningful ways to all the songwriters,"
(sic) (Some terrible grammar there.)

How much financial benefit does a performer or a writer gain from having their song played on the radio or streamed on Spotify or Apple? I don't think this question has ever been satisfactorily answered, though everyone has their own opinion. Certainly the direct gain from royalty payments is small - but I would argue that the publicity is the true payoff. That publicity encourages some people to purchase the music; it encourages others to attend concerts by that performer; it gets their name known, making it more likely that they will score contracts, collaborations etc, down the track. Back in the 1950's there was a phenomenon called payola, whereby radio announcers took bribes, cash or otherwise, to play certain songs. I'm certainly not condoning that, but my point is that, far from expecting to charge royalties to radio stations, the purveyors of the music (which probably meant the record companies rather than the performers) recognised that radio was their meal ticket, and airplay was something worth paying for. In 2016, that probably still applies, you just need to add Spotify and other streaming services into the equation.
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#2
I think this thread related http://www.music-discussion.com/showthre...aunch-Soon Internet platforms and services are growing rapidly because of new technologies and increasing of internet users. Best indicator is youtube. Couple years ago for example popular hits had 100-200 millions and today - billions of views.
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#3
Inna Selez Wrote:I think this thread related http://www.music-discussion.com/showthre...aunch-Soon Internet platforms and services are growing rapidly because of new technologies and increasing of internet users. Best indicator is youtube. Couple years ago for example popular hits had 100-200 millions and today - billions of views.
I don't think anyone is arguing against the claim that "this is the way the industry is going." The question is, to what extent is this a good thing or a bad thing? And does it mean the demise of more traditional ways of hearing music? the article I posted would suggest not.
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#4
I guess it depends on how you look at it. With the availability of music on the internet and music streaming websites along with iTunes, this gives artists a lot more exposure, especially for less well known ones who otherwise might not get as much. How would this negatively effect the industry? I'm not sure, I guess the artists could wind up making less money. I know some artists and bands dislike the direction the industry is going in for whatever reasons, some just don't like the new mode of hearing music and think it rips off their work. -shrug-

I don't know if traditional ways of listening to music will go away. For instance, I can buy books online for a Kindle or e-book, but that doesn't mean I don't appreciate having a real book in my hand which I do. I just bought some at the local book store, for instance. I think it's possible some people worry too much when something new comes along and try to assume the worst. I don't see why listening to music on say YouTube means I can't appreciate buying CD's anymore, though that is just my way of thinking.
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#5
Inna Selez Wrote:I think this thread related http://www.music-discussion.com/showthre...aunch-Soon Internet platforms and services are growing rapidly because of new technologies and increasing of internet users. Best indicator is youtube. Couple years ago for example popular hits had 100-200 millions and today - billions of views.
that's because Youtube views are purchased making the number meaningless

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#6
I have just picked one random date from a sales report for my first project. Bear in mind that this is only from one of the many digital download sites, in this case You Tube music. There are other sales from other sites for the same date (Digital 7/Deezer/Spotify/iTunes etc.etc. the list goes on and on) but I am not going to copy and paste everything here. Too much hassle. This will give you some idea of the payment the composer is getting. In this case 34 copies of the album were streamed by YT subscribers. And for every one copy legitimately paid for there are hundreds and in some case thousands of copies streamed from file-sharing sites. I have been investigating this in some detail and I reckon that 95% of the time the album is streamed 'illegally' and about 5% of the time it is paid for. The bottom line is that once an album exists in digital format you have absolutely no control over where it goes. Comparing to the 'old' system, this one 'store' sale would have generated roughly 300USD for the 34 copies sold on that date.

[TABLE="width: 953"]
[TR="class: ddsales-table"]
[TH="width: 85"]Sales Date[/TH]
[TH]Partner[/TH]
[TH]Artist[/TH]
[TH]Album[/TH]
[TH]Song[/TH]
[TH]COVER[/TH]
[TH]TYPE[/TH]
[TH]Qty[/TH]
[TH="class: price-data"]Unit[/TH]
[TH="class: price-data"]Payable[/TH]
[/TR]
[TR="class: dark-row"]
[TD]Oct 15, 2015[/TD]
[TD="class: notranslate"]YouTube Music[/TD]
[TD="class: notranslate"]Auralscapes[/TD]
[TD="class: notranslate"]Into Imagined Lands[/TD]
[TD="class: notranslate"]Into Imagined Lands[/TD]
[TD="class: notranslate"]No[/TD]
[TD]stream[/TD]
[TD]34.0[/TD]
[TD="class: price-data notranslate USD"]$0.00560000[/TD]
[TD="class: price-data notranslate USD"]$0.18990000[/TD]
[/TR]
[/TABLE]
'The purpose of life is a life of purpose' - Athena Orchard.
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#7
pardon my language everybody but this is a f##ing disgrace and a slap in the face of the artist whoever it may be....
all that hard work you guys do and no reward for your efforts....
its so easy to see why artists like Metallica, Taylor Swift, Bob Dylan etc have said "no" to places like Spotify etc...they/you deserve better IMO.
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#8
To be quite honest it does not bug me a whole lot CH because I am just a hobbyist. My regular job takes care of the bills but if I had to be a professional musician I would be highly pissed off indeed!!!
'The purpose of life is a life of purpose' - Athena Orchard.
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#9
that's okay....im pissed off enough for both of us, and I didn't have any input in your project.

still, its not right, hobbyist or not, you still put your blood, sweat and tears into it, probably worked all hours of the night sometimes just to get one little piece of music just right.

but yeh, I hear what youre saying mate, a professional probably spends a million USD on studio time, engineers etc these days and that's probably just time and money to record and clean up the demo versions and them some Streaming site rips them off like its a disposable product that means nothing,
well actually, most music nowadays is disposable, but still, someone took the time to make it.
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#10
Oceansoul Wrote:I don't see why listening to music on say YouTube means I can't appreciate buying CD's anymore, though that is just my way of thinking.
Good point. In fact I could list quite a number of CDs I have bought, which I would probably not have bought were it not for the fact that I was able to listen to part or all of the music first on Spotify or Youtube. In that sense, they serve much the same function for me as the old way of sitting and listening to an album in the record store before deciding whether to buy it - except that in many cases the stores these days don't even carry the albums I would want to buy.

@CH: I can't help thinking you missed the whole point of my post. It was not just to say that artists get a tiny amount in royalties from streaming, which is well known and which no one would dispute. I was merely debunking a couple of popular misconceptions: streaming is NOT killing off radio, and it is NOT killing off the music industry.
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