not even sure if I own any Whitesnake albums, maybe 1
back in the day, this coulda worked for me
my kind of metal
just can't do it anymore
some decent tracks
of course, not for what todays metalheads like

Grade - 1.4

released Mar 29th, 2011

from the album - Love Will Set You Free - 1.5

from all music


After recording two solo albums, former Deep Purple vocalist David Coverdale formed Whitesnake around 1977. In the glut of hard rock and heavy metal bands of the late '70s, their first albums got somewhat lost in the shuffle, although they were fairly popular in Europe and Japan. During 1982, Coverdale took some time off so he could take care of his sick daughter. When he re-emerged with a new version of Whitesnake in 1984, the band sounded revitalized and energetic. Slide It In may have relied on Led Zeppelin's and Deep Purple's old tricks, but the band had a knack for writing hooks; the record became their first platinum album. Three years later, Whitesnake released an eponymous album (titled 1987 in Europe) that was even better. Portions of the album were blatantly derivative -- "Still of the Night" was a dead ringer for early Zeppelin -- but the group could write powerful, heavy rockers like "Here I Go Again" that were driven as much by melody as riffs, as well as hit power ballads like "Is This Love." Whitesnake was an enormous international success, selling over six million copies in the U.S. alone.

Before they recorded their follow-up, 1989's Slip of the Tongue, Coverdale again assembled a completely new version of the band, featuring guitar virtuoso Steve Vai. Although the record went platinum, it was a considerable disappointment after the across-the-board success of Whitesnake. Coverdale put Whitesnake on hiatus after that album. In 1993, he released a collaboration with former Led Zeppelin guitarist Jimmy Page that was surprisingly lackluster. The following year, Whitesnake issued a greatest-hits album in the U.S. and Canada focusing solely on material from their final three albums (as well as containing a few unreleased tracks).

In 1997, Coverdale resurrected Whitesnake (guitarist Adrian Vandenberg was the only remaining member of the group's latter-day lineup), issuing Restless Heart the same year. Surprisingly, the album wasn't even issued in the United States. On the ensuing tour, Coverdale and Vandenberg performed an "unplugged" show in Japan that was recorded and issued the following year under the title Starkers in Tokyo. By the late '90s, however, Coverdale once again put Whitesnake on hold, as he concentrated on recording his first solo album in nearly 22 years. Coverdale's Into the Light was issued in September 2000, featuring journeyman guitarist Earl Slick. After a lengthy hiatus that saw the release of countless "greatest-hits" and "live" collections, the band returned in 2008 with the impressive Good to Be Bad. Coverdale and Whitesnake toured the album throughout Europe and Japan. The band returned to the recording studio in 2010 with new members bassist Michael Devin (formerly of Lynch Mob) and drummer Brian Tichy, who appeared alongside guitarists Doug Aldrich and Reb Beach, and guest keyboardist Timothy Drury (as well as Coverdale's son Jasper on backing vocals on various tracks). The band's 11th album, Forevermore, was preceded by the issue of the single, "Love Will Set You Free," and released in the spring of 2011.

Album Review

Three years ago, Whitesnake released Good to Be Bad, a comeback album that reached the U.K.’s Top Five. It walked the line between their brand of U.K. hard rock and ‘80s glam metal. On Forevermore, David Coverdale polishes the production -- a tad -- focuses the guitars more, and successfully fuses Whitesnake's various eras, and succeeds in spades. There is a new rhythm section with drummer Brian Tichy and bassist Michael Devlin. Forevermore commences with “Steal Your Heart Away,” an old-school, nasty, slide guitar workout with a harmonica solo, that revs into a full-blown blues-rocker with a killer chorus. Guitarists Doug Aldrich and Reb Beach shine on the instrumental bridge. The album's first single, "Love Will Set You Free," is top-notch Whitesnake that nods back to the early years while grounding itself in the present. "All Out of Luck," and "Tell Me How" measure up in the same way. "I Need You (Shine a Light)" is an enormous surprise; its hook is so infectious it sounds like Coverdale's been listening to Cheap Trick's earliest records. The acoustic midtempo ballad "One Of These Days" carries a trace of country in its melody, hearkening back to the Restless Heart era. Coverdale reveals he's more than competent to write a fine, lyrically savvy love song, when he’s not thinking with his dick. "Fare Thee Well," another acoustic number, showcases Coverdale at his most intimate. "Whipping Boy Blues” is a dirty slide rocker that reconciles both sides of the band. "My Evil Ways," with its calamitous drum intro, is punishing; Coverdale pulls out all the stops to deliver his finest vocal performance on the set. The album's true highlight, however, is in the closing title track. Over seven minutes, it begins as an acoustic number before morphing into a stellar Whitesnake power ballad. After a two-and-a-half minute acoustic guitar/vocal intro, the band enters with a "Kashmir"-like chord sequence; they keep it slow but increase the drama; it eventually explodes into a bone crusher with killer guitar solos and a gorgeous melody. Forevermore, despite its tighter arrangements and more polished production (and "Dogs in the Street," its lone loser cut) is Whitesnake at its Brit hard rock best.

Track Listing

1 Steal Your Heart Away Aldrich 5:18
2 All Out of Luck Aldrich 5:27
3 Love Will Set You Free Aldrich 3:51
4 Easier Said Than Done Aldrich 5:12
5 Tell Me How Aldrich 4:40
6 I Need You (Shine a Light) Aldrich 3:48
7 One of These Days Aldrich 4:52
8 Love & Treat Me Right Aldrich 4:13
9 Dogs in the Street Aldrich 3:47
10 Fare Thee Well Aldrich 5:17
11 Whipping Boy Blues Aldrich 5:01
12 My Evil Ways Aldrich 4:32
13 Forevermore Aldrich 7:23