released Feb 2nd, 2010

from the album - Sick Bubble Gum

YouTube - ROB ZOMBIE Sick Bubblegum

from all music

The longtime frontman for metal superstars White Zombie, Rob Zombie was born Robert Cummings on January 12, 1966, in Haverhill, MA, forming the group soon after moving to New York City circa 1985. He subsequently worked as a bike messenger, porn magazine art director, and production assistant for the classic children's TV series Pee-Wee's Playhouse, concurrently leading White Zombie through a series of cult-favorite indie releases; the success of their 1992 major-label debut, La Sexorcisto: Devil Music Vol. 1, not only launched Zombie to new prominence within the music industry, but also allowed him to try his hand at animation (most notably a hallucinatory sequence of the feature Beavis & Butt-Head Do America) and directing (he was slated to helm the third chapter of The Crow franchise, working from his own screenplay, but Miramax Films eventually pulled out of the deal).

In mid-1998 Zombie made his solo debut with the album Hellbilly Deluxe; when it sold more copies in its first week of release than any White Zombie record before it, he disbanded the group to forge ahead as a full-time solo act, issuing American Made Music to Strip By in the fall of 1999. Starting his own label, Zombie-a-Go-Go Records, he gave bands like the Ghastly Ones a home while creating demented mix CDs like Halloween Hootenanny. He delivered remixes to a number of soundtracks while recording a new song for the Mission Impossible: 2 soundtrack, and he rounded out his first major solo run with a Rob Zombie toy produced by Todd McFarlane.

He began to work on a feature film in April of 2000, funded by Universal Studios after he designed a horror display for their amusement parks. The film, entitled House of 1000 Corpses, was produced and edited, but the studio backed out due to its own corporate standards. Zombie wrangled the rights to the film from the studio while taking out his frustrations on his next solo record, Sinister Urge. Again working with collaborator Scott Humphrey (who had produced his first record), he drafted in a metal superstar cast including Ozzy Osbourne, Slayer guitarist Kerry King, Mötley Crüe/Methods of Mayhem drummer Tommy Lee, and Limp Bizkit's DJ Lethal. The record was another success, leading to a huge Christmas tour with Osbourne at the end of 2001 and another solo tour in the spring of 2002.

Zombie sold House of 1000 Corpses to MGM for a Halloween release, although offers from several smaller studios had to be refused because of the financial loss he would have taken. The film was a cult hit, prompting Zombie to begin work on his next piece of celluloid, 2005's Devil's Rejects. He returned to the recording studio in 2006 for Educated Horses, a typically sinister collection of B-movie swagger that hit the Top Ten of the Billboard album charts. After a stint as director and co-writer of the 2007 remake of Halloween, Zombie Live, his first live album, was released in October 2007, the same month that he began an arena tour with Ozzy Osbourne. The release of his next studio album was pushed back due to Zombie's involvement with Halloween II, and in 2010 Zombie released Hellbilly Deluxe 2, his first solo album written with the help of his band (which featured John 5 and Piggy D.).

album review

As a director or as a musician, Rob Zombie shows no signs of closing the door on either of his creative endeavors anytime soon. Returning with his first album since 2006’s Educated Horses, after several delays following this record’s completion in 2008 — due to his work on Halloween 2, lack of promotion, and time spent shopping for a new label after 18 years of recording for Geffen — Zombie has since gone on to say that the songs on Hellbilly Deluxe 2 were his easiest to write. This could be because it was his first outing to include help from his bandmates (longtime touring comrades guitarist John 5, bassist Piggy D, and drummer Tommy C) but it’s probably more attributed to the fact that making songs like these is old hat by now. “Jesus Frankenstein,” “Sick Bubblegum,” and “Mars Needs Women” are the same schlocky grooves that made up his five previous solo records and six White Zombie records. His trademark “yeah” and monotone hoedown growl are still front and center, the B-horror movie references are still plentiful (Frankenstein, martians, witches, and two songs about werewolves), and the chugging guitars and dark, sleek beats are still trashy enough to be stripclub staples. Chris Baseford’s production is thick throughout, withstanding the single, “What,” a song Zombie and company wrote and recorded in only a few hours. Influenced by ‘60s garage rock, the vocals are run through a maximal amount of mid-range distortion and accented by temporize clinks and organ riffs behind the usual crunch. At this point in his career, his best move is to take these types of risks, and when he does so on the ten-minute closer “The Man Who Laughs,” with its underlying orchestral score by Tyler Bates (composer for the Halloween remakes The Devil’s Rejects and The Watchmen), the results are compelling and unnerving in a good way.

Track Listing

1 Jesus Frankenstein Five, Zombie 5:21
2 Sick Bubble Gum Five, Zombie 3:44
3 What? Five, Zombie 2:47
4 Mars Needs Women Five, Zombie 4:58
5 Werewolf, Baby! Five, Zombie 3:59
6 Virgin Witch Five, Zombie 3:38
7 Death and Destiny Inside the Dream Factory Five, Zombie 2:18
8 Burn Five, Zombie 3:03
9 Cease to Exist Five, Zombie 3:38
10 Werewolf Women of the SS Five, Zombie 3:01
11 The Man Who Laughs Clufetos, D., Five, Zombie 9:44