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Thread: Top 5 Classical Composers

  1. #51

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    1) Ludwig van Beethoven (Late Classical, early Romantic)
    2) Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky (Romantic)
    3) Guillaume DuFay (Renaissance)
    4) Eric Whitacre (Modern)
    5) Arnold Schoenberg (Modern)

  2. #52
    Session Musician johnsandy's Avatar
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    Here 5 top Classical Composers!
    1. Franz Joseph Haydn (1732-1809)
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    Haydn was a remarkable composer, epitomizing the meaning of classical period composition, and though he wasn't as flashy as the younger Mozart, his music always stayed true to form. Haydn, unlike most composers, had a "reliable and steady" job composing, directing, teaching, performing, and managing musicians from the royal Esterhazy family. During this time, Haydn composed many pieces of music for the courtly orchestra to perform. With a staggering body of work, including over 100 symphonies and 60 string quartets, he is often referred to as the "Father of the Symphony" or "Father of the String Quartet."
    2. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791)
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    Did you know that nearly half of Mozart's life was spent touring throughout Europe? Born in 1756, Mozart began composing at the age of five. Shortly thereafter, he toured with his father and sister. Tragically, Mozart died at the young age of 35. Yet during his short life span, Mozart greatly advanced classical period music with over 600 compositions. His compositional style is similar to that of Haydn's, only more flamboyant and often criticized for having "too many notes."
    3. Antonio Salieri (1750-1825)
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    Salieri may have been envious of young Mozart's musical genious, however the rumors of Salieri poisoning Mozart are, in fact, simply rumors. Salieri was a respected Kapellmeister who was most notable for his contributions to opera, but stopped composing operas in 1804 before composing only church music. Salieri was friends with Haydn and gave music composition lessons to Ludwig van Beethoven.
    4. Christoph Willibald Gluck (1714-1787)
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    Thanks to Christoph Willibald Gluck, opera as we know it today, could be radically different. Gluck revolutionized opera by softening the contrast between recitatives and arias by weaving underlying melodic themes and orchestral passages within the recitatives as they flowed into the arias. He wrote his scores in line with the opera's text similar to how modern composers compose film scores, and also melded French and Italian operatic styles. In the late 1760s, Gluck allowed Salieri to study with him and become his protege.
    5. Muzio Clementi (1752-1832)
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    As the "Father of the Pianoforte," Clementi was a strong and vocal promoter of the piano. Clementi was a master of many musical trades including a performer, composer, publisher, teacher, arranger, and even instrument maker. He traveled extensively throughout Europe, collecting and publishing music manuscripts including those of Beethoven's and selling pianos. He also taught students that went on to teach great composers like Chopin and Mendelssohn. Clementi's most notable body of work includes his compositions for piano: Gradus ad Parnassum and three piano sonatas.

  3. #53
    Lead Vocalist Bellini48's Avatar
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    You intend that they belonged to the classical period in a tight sense? Beethoven belonged to the inherent CLASSICAL period also, and you wouldn't call him great? He even started to burst the 'classical' period's seams, anticipating the romantic period. I agree with your exposition, very accurate, but the original thread was intended differently. Most non-experts intend 'classical' music far more generally than we do. And this misunderstanding is taken up by media in general when pubblicizing musical genres. Of course we cannot call MONTEVERDI a classical, as studied musicians. Nor Orlando Di Lasso, or Palestrina. Not to mention the Trobadours and Trouviers of the middle ages. But most would refer to them erroneously as classical or 'cultured' music, as opposed to popular music, that some would call 'uncultured'. Erroneously, I would add. But thank you for your analysis.
    Cogito, ergo sum...

  4. #54

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    These are all 20th Century composers, not classical composers.

  5. #55
    Roadie
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    if i had to pick 5 today they would be

    Beethoven
    Mozart
    Vaughan Williams
    Rachmaninoff
    Bach,

    though if asked next week the 5 will be different.

  6. #56

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    Bach
    Dvorak
    Tchaikovski
    Vivaldi
    Beethoven

  7. #57

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    Here goes with my first post:

    Beethoven
    Bach
    Haydn
    Mozart
    Vivaldi

    Although as others have mentioned this is variable. Some days I wouldn't listen to any of these but they are the tried and true ones I go back too :)

  8. #58

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    I won't be original:

    1) Mozart
    2) Beethoven
    3) Chopin
    4) Bach
    5) Vivaldi

  9. #59
    a restless spirit Jerome's Avatar
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    I once dated a lady whose daughter is a talented violist. I know nothing about classical music but listening to her practice and absorbing some of the pieces she was playing in preparation for her degree in music started shifting my attention away from rock music and helped me gain an appreciation for this 'new' genre. She was a fan of Dvorak, so I recognize some pieces by him, but outside of that it's still an unexplored terrain. And there is a hell of a lot of it to explore. There are very, very few composers in the world today who come anywhere close to what the classical masters of old have achieved. Same is true of painting, have a look at any Johannes Vermeer painting. We just do not see that sort of quality anymore. And when it comes to architecture, you only have to look around the cities of Europe to realise what we have lost.
    'The purpose of life is a life of purpose' - Athena Orchard.

  10. #60
    Super Moderator SteveO's Avatar
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    Well stated Jerome ! In reality nothing can touch or come close to the compositions of the classical masters !!!! I would add that the classical voice is the ultimate in singing also !
    Quote Originally Posted by Jerome View Post
    I once dated a lady whose daughter is a talented violist. I know nothing about classical music but listening to her practice and absorbing some of the pieces she was playing in preparation for her degree in music started shifting my attention away from rock music and helped me gain an appreciation for this 'new' genre. She was a fan of Dvorak, so I recognize some pieces by him, but outside of that it's still an unexplored terrain. And there is a hell of a lot of it to explore. composers in the world today who come anywhere closeThere are very, very few to what the classical masters of old have achieved. Same is true of painting, have a look at any Johannes Vermeer painting. We just do not see that sort of quality anymore. And when it comes to architecture, you only have to look around the cities of Europe to realise what we have lost.
    " WHEN I WAS FIVE YEARS OLD, MY MOTHER ALWAYS TOLD ME THAT HAPPINESS WAS THE KEY TO LIFE. WHEN I WENT TO SCHOOL, THEY ASKED ME WHAT I WANTED TO BE WHEN I GREW UP. I WROTE DOWN "HAPPY". THEY TOLD ME I DIDN'T UNDERSTAND THE ASSIGNMENT AND I TOLD THEM THEY DIDN'T UNDERSTAND LIFE."

    - JOHN LENNON

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