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Thread: Bryan Ferry - Avonmore

  1. #1
    Grumpy Old Man Music Head's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Lancaster, Kentucky, United States

    Default Bryan Ferry - Avonmore

    enters the Billboard chart this week at #72

    Spotify online listen
    4.0 of 5.0 by allmusic

    14th studio album
    no mistaking who this is
    good album

    artist website -

    Bio - from allmusic

    While his tenure as the frontman for the legendary Roxy Music remained his towering achievement, singer Bryan Ferry also carved out a successful
    solo career that continued in the lush, sophisticated manner perfected on the group's final records. Born September 26, 1945, in Washington,
    England, Ferry, the son of a coal miner, began his musical career as a singer with the rock outfit the Banshees while studying art at the
    University of Newcastle Upon Tyne under pop conceptualist Richard Hamilton. He later joined the Gas Board, a soul group featuring bassist Graham
    Simpson; in 1970, Ferry and Simpson formed Roxy Music.

    Within a few years, Roxy Music had become phenomenally successful, affording Ferry the opportunity to cut his first solo LP in 1973. Far removed
    from the group's arty glam rock, These Foolish Things established the path that all of Ferry's solo work -- as well as the final Roxy Music
    records -- would take, focusing on elegant synth pop interpretations of '60s hits like Bob Dylan's "A Hard Rain's A-Gonna Fall," the Rolling
    Stones' "Sympathy for the Devil," and the Beatles' "You Won't See Me," all rendered in the singer's distinct, coolly dramatic manner.

    Roxy Music remained Ferry's primary focus, but in 1974 he returned with a second solo effort, Another Time, Another Place, another collection of
    covers ranging from "You Are My Sunshine" to "It Ain't Me, Babe" to "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes." His third venture, 1976's Let's Stick Together,
    featured remixed, remade, and remodeled versions of Roxy Music hits as well as the usual assortment of covers. Released in 1977, In Your Mind
    was Ferry's first collection of completely original material; the following year's The Bride Stripped Bare, a work inspired by his broken
    romance with model Jerry Hall, split evenly between new songs and covers.

    Ferry did not record another solo album until 1985's Boys and Girls, a sleek, seamless effort that was his first "official" solo release
    following the Roxy breakup. For 1987's Bete Noire, he was joined by former Smiths guitarist Johnny Marr on the shimmering "The Right Stuff," and
    notched his only U.S. Top 40 hit with "Kiss and Tell." Another covers collection, Taxi, followed in 1993; Mamouna, an LP of originals, appeared
    a year later, and in 1999 Ferry returned with a collection of standards, As Time Goes By. After a brief tour in support of As Time Goes By,
    there were rumors of a Roxy Music reunion. The next summer, the practically unimaginable came true when Ferry joined Andy Mackay and Phil
    Manzanera for a tour of Europe and the U.S. It was a celebration of hits, and the band's first jaunt out in more than a decade.

    In summer 2002, Ferry returned to his solo career for the electrifying Frantic. Dylanesque, a set of Bob Dylan covers, followed in 2007,
    featuring assistance from several longtime associates (including Brian Eno, Chris Spedding, Paul Carrack, and Robin Trower). Ferry signed with
    the Astralwerks imprint for the release of 2010's Olympia. In 2012, he assembled the Bryan Ferry Orchestra and recorded The Jazz Age. This
    completely instrumental album featured his band re-recording some of his biggest hits in a 1920s jazz style. Ferry returned to the studio in
    2014 to record his 14th studio album with longtime collaborator Rhett Davies. The resulting Avonmore -- which included guest spots from Johnny
    Marr, Nile Rodgers, and Marcus Miller and revived Ferry's mid-'80s sound -- appeared in November.

    Album Review - from allmusic

    On the album art of Avonmore, the record he released when he was a year shy of 70, Bryan Ferry showcases himself as a dashing young man -- a
    portrait of an artist not as a glam trailblazer or distinguished elder statesman, but rather caught in an indeterminate time between the
    gorgeous heartbreak of Roxy Music's Avalon and the meticulous solo work that came immediately in its wake. This is Ferry's prime, a moment when
    his legacy was intact but yet to be preserved in amber. Avonmore consciously evokes this distinct period, sometimes sighing into the exquisite
    ennui of Avalon but usually favoring the fine tailoring of Boys & Girls, a record where every sequenced rhythm, keyboard, and guitar line
    blended into an alluring urbane pulse. Ferry isn't so much racing to revive a younger edition of himself as much as laying claim to this
    particular strand of sophisticated pop, one that happens to feel a shade richer now when it's delivered by an artist whose world-weariness has
    settled into his marrow but is yet to sadden him. This much is apparent on Avonmore's closing covers, an oddly appropriate pairing of Stephen
    Sondheim's "Send in the Clowns" and Robert Palmer's "Johnny & Mary" that are both given gently meditative electronic makeovers, but much of the
    record explores the other end of the Ferry spectrum, where he's making music to dance away the heartache. He's no longer on the floor himself,
    preferring to watch with a bit of a bemusement, but this reserved romanticism suits him perfectly, particularly because Ferry and his co-
    producer Rhett Davies -- a steady collaborator since 1999's standards record As Time Goes By -- place an emphasis on mood but not at the expense
    of the songs. Naturally, what is first alluring about Avonmore is its feel -- it's meant to be seductive -- but the songs are what makes this
    record something more than a fling.

    lead track:

    Track Listing

    1. Loop de Li
    2. Midnight Train
    3. Soldier of Fortune
    4. Driving Me Wild
    5. A Special Kind of Guy
    6. Avonmore
    7. Lost
    8. One Night Stand
    9. Send in the Clowns
    10. Johnny and Mary
    “A man only learns in two ways, one by reading, and the other by association with smarter people.”
    Will Rogers

  2. #2
    Record Label Executive
    Join Date
    Feb 2014


    I've enjoyed Mr. Ferry since forever, following him on all his trails. I like this too but gotta say that's one odd video. Here's the lyrics:
    A man accustomed to hear only the echo of his own sentiments, soon bars all the common avenues of delight, and has no part in the general gratification of mankind--Dr. Johnson
    What he said. Amen, Bro--JazzboCR

  3. #3
    Lead Vocalist Big Ears's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2014
    Hampshire, England


    I was interested to see Bryan Ferry has released a new album, but I did not like the Bob Dylan covers. They should've been good, but weren't.
    “The fool doth think he is wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool.” William Shakespeare, As You Like It

  4. #4
    Record Label Executive
    Join Date
    Feb 2014


    Some more Bryan Ferry stuff--can't seem to get enough lately. Anyway, an interview then 3 songs on the most excellent Later...with Jools Holland: Mr. Ferry is still criminally handsome, damn his eyes...and still interiorizes what it is he does. Takes Mr. Holland to draw him out a bit. << Same show, 4 years previous (different band). BUT he surrounds himself with the best--he doesn't use them; he extracts the best from them--very different thing (Think: Erich Kunzel with the Cincinnatti Pops).
    A man accustomed to hear only the echo of his own sentiments, soon bars all the common avenues of delight, and has no part in the general gratification of mankind--Dr. Johnson
    What he said. Amen, Bro--JazzboCR

  5. #5


    Jools Holland Show.. .

    The best music show ever IMO....

    He has around five different artists on every show.
    A good mix of genres and a mix of legends,established,relative new comers and those just starting out...
    Usually interviews one of those artists also...

    Jools even jumps in on keys occasionally to play with one or two of the artists.

    Jools was a founding member of Uk new wave band Squeeze/UK Squeeze in the late '70s, famous for their international hit " cool for cats"

    Only Elvis Costello's "spectacle" show comes close to it IMO

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