enters the Billboard chart this week at #7

Spotify online listen
4.5 of 5.0 from allmusic

6th studio album
totally not what I expected
this is a good album

Bio - from allmusic

The country vocal quartet Little Big Town began with Kimberly Roads and Karen Fairchild, two Georgia natives who began singing together in
college. Arkansas-born and Alabama-raised Jimi Westbrook, a friend of Fairchild's husband, joined them to make a trio, and the group was
completed by the addition of Arkansan Phil Sweet in 1998. From the outset, Little Big Town devoted their sound to harmony and multiple lead
vocals, a combination that made the band a hard sell at first. They finally landed a deal at Mercury Records, but it fell through due to
disagreements about musical direction. In the wake of the success of the Dixie Chicks, however, Little Big Town suddenly seemed a more likely
commercial proposition, and they were taken up by the Dixie Chicks' label, Monument Records, in 2000.

Recording sessions lasted longer than usual for a country release, but Monument finally issued the band's debut single, "Don't Waste My Time,"
in the winter of 2002. The song was on its way up the charts when its accompanying album, Little Big Town, arrived in May. Although the debut
produced several minor hits, Little Big Town didn't become a superstar act until 2005, when The Road to Here yielded four Top 20 singles
(including the ballad "Bring It On Home") and earned the group its first platinum record. A Place to Land followed in 2007 and netted three
singles, none of which made it into the Top 30, but the band's profile continued to grow due to incessant touring and supporting acts from
Sugarland to Carrie Underwood. Fairchild also guested with John Mellencamp on his album Life Death Love and Freedom. In May of 2010 "Little
White Church" appeared as a single that peaked at number 14 on the Billboard country chart; in August of that year, Little Big Town's fourth
studio album, The Reason Why, was released by Capitol. The band returned in 2012 with the single "Pontoon," which wound up topping Billboard's
country charts. The band's fifth full-length album, Tornado, followed in September 2012. It was their first release to be produced by the ex-In
Pursuit member Jay Joyce, and it became their highest placed album on the Billboard 200 up to that point, reaching number two. Joyce was
retained for their next album's sessions and the resulting record, Pain Killer, appeared in October 2014, preceded by the single "Day Drinking."

Album Review - from allmusic

Little Big Town have long been compared to Fleetwood Mac, usually due to their lush harmonies and taste for sun-kissed melodic pop. If that
analogy holds water -- and it does -- then Pain Killer is Little Big Town's Tusk, the record where the group bends, twists, and reshapes
expectations of what the band can do. Coming after the sweet, shiny Tornado, the restless over-saturation in Killer is something of a shock. As
pure description, the elements sound strictly mainstream: there are gnarled, distorted guitars, flirtations with electronics, thick walloping
rhythms, everything that would seemingly amount to a full-fledged arena-country crossover. Instead of following a predictable pattern, the
quartet embarks on a series of detours, seizing each individual track as an opportunity to veer a little further off course. While there's none
of the frenzied madness that pulsates underneath Tusk, Little Big Town do slide into a bit of minor-key madness on "Faster Gun" and have to hold
their tongue on "Quit Breaking Up with Me"; otherwise they'd spit out profanity. That mischievousness is intertwined with aural adventure on
Pain Killer: there's a sense that the group members are goading each other on, daring their bandmates to dabble in a bit of reggae ("Pain
Killer"), to add a whistle to a chorus ("Day Drinking"), to write a swaying slow dance about a "Girl Crush," or to turn a bit of back-porch
picking into a funky stomp ("Stay All Night"). Even though this record settles into a finale of three successive folk-rock tunes -- all three
softly gorgeous -- it's the previous series of left-hand tours that gives Pain Killer its kick: this is the rarest thing in contemporary
country, a record with an expansive world-view delivered with a kinetic kick and infallible melodies, a record that gives no indication of where
it's going upon first listen but remains compelling upon further spins, after all the dazzle dissipates and Little Big Town's craft shines

the first single of Day Drinking was released back in June
and went to #13 on the country chart
it was posted as a new single then
I still don't like it
I prefer this:

Track Listing

1. Quit Breaking Up with Me
2. Day Drinking
3. Tumble and Fall
4. Pain Killer
5. Girl Crush
6. Faster Gun
7. Good People
8. Stay All Night
9. Save Your Sin
10. Live Forever
11. Things You Don't Think About
12. Turn the Lights On
13. Silver and Gold